Update on Octopus fishery management in Banggai Archipelago

Update on Octopus fishery management in Banggai Archipelago

It is almost three years that we and our partner, Blue Venture, have been conducting Octopus data collection in Popisi village, Banggai Laut District. The landing data were collected by our enumerators who are also Octopus buyer middlemen. The data that are collected include date, weight, sex, mantle length, fishers and fishing grounds. The purpose of the collected data is to utilise it in the decision-making process in fishery management, for example, to consider and implement temporary closure of fishing grounds. 

Based on the data collection and consultative meetings with local stakeholders, we conducted the first temporary closure for Octopus in Asasal Island (385 Ha), which was closed from October 2018 to January 2019. The fishers acknowledged the economic benefits of the closure, even though they did not significantly increase when compared to last year’s production. However, we felt the positivity and enthusiasm from the communities in the effort to manage their marine resources. We used the momentum to engage them for the next closure, which is now happening in Bone Baru village, Banggai Laut District. The second temporary closure for the Octopus fishery in Bone Baru (246.36Ha) will continue until December 2019. The period of the closure is three months, the same as in Asasal. Looking at the lessons learned from the first closure, now we are strengthening the surveillance of the closure by its local surveillance team through a signed decision letter from the Head of Banggai Utara Sub-district. The letter included the legalisation of four villagers of Bone Baru, who are responsible for surveillance and enforcement during the implementation of the temporary closure. 

Installation of a buoy to mark the temporary closure’s boundary (photo: LINI)

This year, we have also expanded our Octopus data collection to include two villages in Banggai Kepulauan District: Kalumbatan and Lobuton, with assistance from our new intern, Parisa, who will follow the data collection process in the field. He is supervised by Neni from Yayasan KALI, who has experience in the collection in Popisi. 

Socialisation of Octopus data collection in Kalumbatan and Lobuton with Neni and Parisa (photo: LINI)
Working together with Australian Students as part of the New Colombo Plan

Working together with Australian Students as part of the New Colombo Plan

We are grateful that LINI has taken part in the New Colombo Plan scholarships during the last three years. Since 2017, we hosted ten Australian students from Murdoch University and the University of Australia. The students came to our Centre to help us with various programs, in order to apply their university knowledge. They assisted us in aquaculture, teaching English to local communities, environmental education in local primary schools, and setting up a permaculture garden.  This year, we had three students from Murdoch University. They were Saskia, who was helping us to re-design our LINI website, Nikki who was teaching the local children to swim, and Holy, who was creating some LATC program videos. Thanks to them, we now have an updated website, swimming goggles for the inventory of the swimming classes, and videos for marketing materials about our Centre

Saskia, Nikki and Holy during the swimming class (photos: Nyka)

Collaborations like this are very important to the success of our work because they benefit not only our organization but also the fisher community, whose children have learned to swim for the first time! It is important to note that, in Les village, many people do not know how to swim, even though they live close to the beach, and they/their families are fishers.

Aquaculture Research in the LATC

Aquaculture Research in the LATC

At the beginning of this year, we planned to make some improvements in our aquaculture facility. One of these was to enhance the nutritional intake of the fish, to encourage optimal health of the marine species for our breeding program. Marine Aquarium fish are valued and admired based on their colours and patterns and improved health helps to make fish look more beautiful. We aim to have a breeding program with broodstocks that produce an optimal number of viable eggs and healthy offsprings. Currently, our cultured clownfish have a “bleache” light pale orange colour, which makes them less attractive than their wild-caught counterparts. In addition, many broodstocks have a low frequency in the numbers of eggs laid, or the eggs turn out to be unviable and dod not hatch. These problems may be caused by a lack of essential nutritents, (such as phosphate and vitamins) in the feed we give to our clownfish. In early August, we started trials, where we varied the different kinds of feed given to the baby clownfish. Our intern, Wayan helped us by testing the effect of giving enriched Artemia shrimps (given additional food and supplements) on the growth rates of the young clownfish, and the sharpness and brightness of their colours and patterns. He designed a mini research project to enrich the shrimp (Artemia) with Spirulina, cod oil and a combination of Spirulina – cod oil. The objective of the experiment was to identify which enriched diet produced the growth rates and colouration. In aquaculture industry, the food can cost up to 60% of operational budget, therefore, the effectiveness of the feed in producing healthy organisms is central to the success of the business, both in terms of finance and quality products.

Wayan helping in the aquarium making process (left) and Wayan working on the feed trials (photos: Made Partiana)

We would like to continue the research, which aims to discover the most effective combination of nutrients that produce the best enrichment of Artemia shrimp for feeding to the baby fish. We would like to encourage Indonesian students who are interested in taking part in this research for their thesis in their final year at University. Would anyone who would like to join in this work please send an email to info@lini.or.id we will then provide further details regarding the research schedule and requirements. 

Helping the Banda Traditional Tuna Fishers to comply with the Fishing regulations

Helping the Banda Traditional Tuna Fishers to comply with the Fishing regulations

In the last 5 years, the Sustainable Fisheries Partnership (SFP) and LINI have been helping to improve a small-scale fishery of the Yellowfin Tuna in the Banda Archipelago. Since 2017, we have tried to assist the fishers to register their small boats to get their registration number cards, called Bukti Pendaftaran Kapal Perikanan(BPKP). This process has been slow, because there is a lot of documentation that the boat owners need to have. After a long process, to date there are 96 out of 184 boats from Banda Islands that already have BPKP. After receiving BPKP, the boat owners are required to paint the name of the boats on the hull. Since the beginning of August 2019, the fishers have painted their boats’ names on the fishing boats according to the name registered on their BPKP.

This year, the Banda fishery may take part in the Full Assessment of the Marine Stewardship Council (MSC). The MSC is a certification for seafood products that certify wild-caught fishery to meet sustainability, credibility and traceability criteria. One of the MSC principles is Effective Management which reads – “meet all local, national and international laws and must have a management system in place to respond to changing circumstances and maintain sustainability”. This is what the handline tuna Fishery Improvement Projects trying to implement in the field.

Helping tuna fishers to name their boats (photos: Andre)
Practical Session for Banggai Cardinalfish Habitat Restoration

Practical Session for Banggai Cardinalfish Habitat Restoration

The Banggai Cardinalfish (BCF) is an endemic species that is only found in the Banggai Archipelago. The species is a popular marine aquarium fish that has been exploited for the overseas market. The species was listed as endangered by IUCN in 2007. In its natural habitat, the BCF is found associations with various microhabitats such as sea urchins, hard corals, anemones and seagrass beds. The declining populations of the BCF have not only been caused by overexploitation for the marine aquarium trade, but also because of excessive extraction of some of the microhabitats, in which they are found, including  anemones and sea urchins. 

On 21 -22 August 2019 Dit. KKHL, the Ministry of Maritime and Fisheries Affairs, together with LINI, conducted practical sessions for stakeholders.  the sessions included socialisation and rehabilitation practices for the Banggai Cardinalfish Habitats. These activities were conducted in the Labotan Sosodek meeting hall of the Banggai Laut Regency. The event was attended by 38 participants, and included various stakeholders and communities from the Banggai Laut and Banggai Kepulauan Regencies. The activities were aimed at providing information about the importance of protecting the various microhabitats of the BCF and included practical demonstrations – showing  how to rehabilitate the BCF habitats.LINI staff provided the practical sessions. These included anemone fragging (the asexual propagation method) and the construction of artificial reef structures with the Hexaframe design. It is hoped that the communities and stakeholders in the Districts of Bangai Laut and Banggai Kepulauan will now be able to carry out BCF habitat rehabilitation in their respective regions. In this way, with community empowerment and direct involvement, the habitats of the BCF will have a greater chance of being protected and preserved.

Participants constructed Hexaframe and learned to propagate anemone
(photos: Surya and Khalis)

We field-tested our propagation manual for anemones, which was developed by our previous intern, Azen, who conducted anemone propagation in the LATC during his three months internship. The Hexaframe manual was developed for our reef restoration program in collaboration with the Coral Reef Alliance.

Azen doing anemone propagatio (photo: Azen)

LINI offers training on aquaculture and reef restoration which is the result of the lessons learned at the LATC. We are trying to use simple methods and materials that are available locally, so that these methods can be replicated by local communities with limited resources.