Conservation efforts for the Banggai Cardinalfish in Banggai Island

Conservation efforts for the Banggai Cardinalfish in Banggai Island

Yayasan LINI and Yayasan KALI (Khatulistiwa Alam Lestari) conducted surveys of the Banggai Cardinalfish as an effort to monitor the populations of this endangered species in Banggai Laut District, Central Sulawesi. This activity has been conducted annually since 2014 with the purpose of supporting the conservation and management of the Banggai Cardinalfish populations within the area of their natural distribution from year to year.

The Banggai Cardinalfish (Pterapogon kauderni) is a species of reef fish endemic to the Banggai Archipelago in Northeast Sulawesi, Indonesia, and has a very limited geographical range. It is a popular marine aquarium fish that has been exploited for overseas markets since the mid-1990s.

The survey was conducted in early May 2017 at 11 different locations around Banggai Island: Popisi, Asasal, Bone Baru, Bongo, Kapela, Tolokibit, Monsongan, Tinakin Laut,  Areas around Peleng Island (Liang village, Paisuluno, and Lumbia-Lumbia) were also surveyed. The results showed that Popisi had the highest numbers of Banggai Cardinalfish, with 1910 individuals in 1500 square meters, while the lowest population density was found in Tolokibit, with around 108 individuals in 1500 square meters

The results of the survey were presented at the stakeholders’ meeting held in Banggai town in May 2017. The local stakeholders, which included local Government and community, appreciated the monitoring program and they have high hopes that this endemic fish will not become extinct. The purpose of the stakeholders meeting was to discuss the plan to include the species in the protected species list under National law, and several options for management measures of the Banggai Cardinalfish. These include closed seasons for fishing, the establishment of conservation areas, a quota which limits the harvested volumes of fish, and allowable size. Further discussions are planned to be held before the end of 2017.

“The survey and monitoring activities need to be done continuously in order to track the condition of the populations of this endemic fish so that, if necessary, rapid actions can be taken to save the fish from extinction.” said Surya Risuana, one of the  LINI field staff.

Furthermore, LINI plans to conduct aquaculture activities for breeding Banggai Cardinalfish along with regional Government of Banggai Laut in Banggai Island, to reduce further declines in the fish populations throughout their natural distribution.

A One-Month Training Programme with Two Students from Cochin University, India

A One-Month Training Programme with Two Students from Cochin University, India

Sariga and Anju, two Students from Cochin University, Kerala, India,  took part in a  one-month training program from 14th May until 14th June, at the LINI LATC, desa Les, North Bali. This training programme aimed to teach them on-site about marine ornamental fish aquaculture, coral reef restoration, and fish identification techniques.

 

The LINI LATC programme is responding directly to the need to reduce the destruction of Indonesia’s globally important coral reefs. Through this training programme, the students were given an opportunity for work experience in various aspects of marine conservation, reef restoration, aquaculture, and sustainable fishery management.

 

 “LINI was a practical experience for me in marine ornamental fisheries. I was also able to acquire a greater in-depth knowledge about LINI and its activities. The role played by LINI in helping the livelihoods of fishermen in les village is highly admirable” Said Sariga.

 

“This one-month training programme helped me to learn about the possibilities of non-destructive fishing practices in the ornamental fish trade, various marine fisheries conservation activities, community empowerment, marine aquaculture, and the need for sustainable trade practices. I can recommend this program for all research scholars working in the field of fisheries management. This programme will greatly enable you to change your outlook towards the ornamental fish industry and also help you to develop various skills that will help to focus your future research”  said Anju.

North Bali

North Bali

LINI has been working with the aquarium fishers from Les village since 2008. In 2010, together with the fishers from Les and Penuktukan village, we have been restoring reefs in their villages using artificial reef structures. The reefs in Les village had become seriously damaged due to the destructive fishing methods used in the past. The focus of this project is to restore fish populations and enhance habitats, so that these artificial reefs can provide alternative collection areas to reduce the fishing pressure on natural reefs.

In December 2014, LINI started developing the LINI Aquaculture and Training Centre in Les viilage. The development of the Centre responds directly to the need to reduce the destruction of Indonesia’s globally important coral reefs, and to create incentives for reef management and conservation that benefit coastal communities who depend on coral reef resources.
The Centre received support from the Australian Consulate-General in Bali through their Direct Aid Program, the family of Sianawati Sugiarto (the owner of Blue Star), who kindly let LINI use their land, and from the Australian Volunteer for International Development (AVID) Program.