2018 – What we have achieved in working with coastal communities at our field sites?

2018 – What we have achieved in working with coastal communities at our field sites?

The year 2018 is nearly at an end. Looking back at the last three months, we have been busy at our field sites, North Bali, Banggai Island (Central Sulawesi), and the Banda Islands (Central Moluccas).

The North Bali project continues to add more artificial reef structures onto the house reefs of the LINI Aquaculture and Training Centre (LATC). This year we deployed over 200 structures (fish domes and rotibuaya). These artificial structures have created new habitats for reef fish, and provide hard substrates on which new soft and hard coral larvae can settle, attach, and grow. Over 60 Indonesian and International high school students, 10 University students from the US, Australia and UK, and 12 Airbnb volunteers participated in the making of these artificial structures.

Through collaboration with the coastal community of Tejakula sub-District and the CORAL Alliance, the LINI team will start the community monitoring of the artificial structures in January 2019. The reef restoration monitoring will include coral recruitment, growth of the corals, and fish diversity. Indonesian students are invited to further study the marine environment by participating in this monitoring. 

We have been doing some interesting community-based work on the octopus fisheries in the Banggai Islands, Central Sulawesi, supported by the Blue Ventures —with some notable achievements, particularly in establishing a Foundation for community-based fishery management, and collecting the data needed to support management decisions. In early October 2018, two villages (Popisi and Paisumosini) in North Banggai sub-District, jointly agreed to temporarily close a 385 ha octopus fishing area of reefs around Asasal Island for three months. The purpose of the temporary closure is to increase the numbers and weights of the octopus caught during the rest of the year.

This November, together with the Indonesian Institute of Sciences (LIPI), MMAF, the Fisheries office of Banggai Laut District, and the Banggai community, we conducted population monitoring of the endangered endemic Banggai cardinalfish at 16 sites. Seven sites showed declines in Banggai cardinalfish populations. Further studies are needed to find out more about the causes of these population decreases.

Our work in the Banda Islands with the Banda tuna handline fishermen progresses well, with port sampling landing data continuing to be conducted to support the development of a harvest strategy for yellowfin tuna in the Archipelagic waters of the Western Pacific. In August this year, we installed 5 time-lapse cameras on five boats to capture the fishing activities of the handline fishers. One of the purposes of using these cameras is to understand the impact of the tuna handline fishery on endangered, threatened and protected species such as sea turtles, dolphins and seabirds while fishing for tuna. The work remains exciting as we continue to assist the fishery to be ready for full assessment for MSC certification next year.

This year we are securing a new partnership with the Coral Alliance for our community reef restoration project in North Bali, and we will receive new funding from the Critical Ecosystem Partnership Fund to support our work on the development of community-based conservation and management of coastal resources around Banggai Island in Sulawesi.

We wish you all the very best for the New Year!

A One-Month Training Programme with Two Students from Cochin University, India

A One-Month Training Programme with Two Students from Cochin University, India

Sariga and Anju, two Students from Cochin University, Kerala, India,  took part in a  one-month training program from 14th May until 14th June, at the LINI LATC, desa Les, North Bali. This training programme aimed to teach them on-site about marine ornamental fish aquaculture, coral reef restoration, and fish identification techniques.

 

The LINI LATC programme is responding directly to the need to reduce the destruction of Indonesia’s globally important coral reefs. Through this training programme, the students were given an opportunity for work experience in various aspects of marine conservation, reef restoration, aquaculture, and sustainable fishery management.

 

 “LINI was a practical experience for me in marine ornamental fisheries. I was also able to acquire a greater in-depth knowledge about LINI and its activities. The role played by LINI in helping the livelihoods of fishermen in les village is highly admirable” Said Sariga.

 

“This one-month training programme helped me to learn about the possibilities of non-destructive fishing practices in the ornamental fish trade, various marine fisheries conservation activities, community empowerment, marine aquaculture, and the need for sustainable trade practices. I can recommend this program for all research scholars working in the field of fisheries management. This programme will greatly enable you to change your outlook towards the ornamental fish industry and also help you to develop various skills that will help to focus your future research”  said Anju.

Khalis Dwi H – An Intern’s Experience, LINI FIP(Fisheries Improvement Project) in Banda Neira

Khalis Dwi H – An Intern’s Experience, LINI FIP(Fisheries Improvement Project) in Banda Neira

The opportunity to become an intern in a marine fishery activity was a blessing for me.  As an undergraduate student of marine science still searching for his identity, this was an opportunity for me get to know myself better, to get to know a new environment in the eastern part of Indonesia, to get to know the life of a fisherman, and to put what I had learnt in lectures into practice in the real world.  Continue reading

Fisheries Improvement Project

Fisheries Improvement Project

A Fisheries Improvement Project (FIP) is an industry-led alliance of supply chain groups, from fishers to exporters to buyers, who work together to implement a management plan designed to help the fisheries meet the demands of the international market while reducing illegal fishing practices, habitat destruction and bycatch.

LINI and the Sustainable Fisheries Partnership are working together to help the seafood industry in Indonesia develop a Fisheries Improvement Project. LINI’s role is to assist small scale projects by supporting implementation of the projects in the field, including FIP training using SFP FIP tools, facilitating stakeholder consultations, and acting as coordinator for the industry-led FIP.

Information on the industry led FIPs is publicly available on the the industry website, which is administered by LINI. It is our role to assist the FIPs in updating FIP progress on the website, editing and reviewing the progress updates and supporting the administration of FIP implementation.

Sustainable Ornamental Fisheries

Sustainable Ornamental Fisheries

Indonesia has been a hotspot of marine ornamental fish collection for the global market for at least 30 years. While the trade provides an important source of income for thousands of coastal communities, it is often based on unsustainable resource use and threatens the health of coastal marine ecosystems. A responsible and sustainable ornamental fish trade needs to be developed urgently and should be based on well-managed ecosystems and their resources, with shared responsibilities along the entire supply chains from the collectors to the consumers.

The marine ornamental trade in Indonesia has been active for so long that sustainability issues are now a matter for concern. Over-exploitation and the use of destructive collecting techniques are still widespread, with many high value targeted species being collected with cyanide. Stock mortalities remain high prior to export, because post -harvest handling techniques are poor and sourcing organisms that come from responsible and sustainable fisheries has also proven difficult due to a lack of reliable data.

As with other fisheries in Indonesia, effective reef fisheries management policies are currently lacking, and no local or national legal framework exists to support or regulate ornamental fish collection and trade. The trade is not an integrated business operation, which adds to the complexity of the supply chains. There are often several buyers between the collectors and exporters, which makes it a challenge to trace the origin of the stock. In addition, long trade routes negatively affect the health and survival rates of the organisms.

To address these issues, LINI, as the first and only local NGO working on the development of sustainable marine ornamental fisheries in Indonesia, aims to support the conservation and management of marine ornamental fisheries throughout Indonesia, by empowering coastal communities, providing training in practical skills, promoting fairer trade and more sustainable practices of marine resource use.