Banda handline tuna fishers attended training on how to release live seabirds caught on fishing lines

Banda handline tuna fishers attended training on how to release live seabirds caught on fishing lines

Fishers who catch yellowfin tuna with handlines in the Banda Sea look for birds and dolphins as signs of the presence of tuna. Although the handline fisheries have little impact on interactions with Endangered, Threatened, or Protected (ETP) species, there is evidence that some seabirds are being caught on the handlines. Examples of this were captured using time-lapse cameras (TLC), installed during August – October 2018 and March-May 2019.  From 317 fishing trips, three interactions with seabirds were recorded in 2018. 

Interaction with seabirds

On 20 and 27 December 2019, we conducted training in the Banda Islands on live seabird releases. 44 fishers/boat captains attended the training. Fishers were trained on how to release the birds and avoid seabird interactions. 

We would like to thank the Agreement on the Conservation of Albatrosses and Petrels (ACAP) staff who provided training materials about Hook Removal from Seabirds.

Poster showing the method of hook removal from seabird (Source: ACAP, click here to see the original poster)

After the training, the Tuna Banda Stakeholder Forum distributed boat licenses (BPKP and PAS KECIL) to tuna fishers in Waer village, Combir village and Kampung Baru village. This was a form of compliance with a Decree of the Governor of Maluku (Peraturan Gubernur Maluku No. 42a Tahun 2017) and a Decree of  Fisheries Office of Maluku decree (DKP Maluku No 523.3/1026/18k Tahun 2018). 

Tracking the fishing activities of octopus fishers in Banggai Laut

Tracking the fishing activities of octopus fishers in Banggai Laut

On 28 April, nine Vessel Tracking Systems (VTS), provided by Pelagic Data Systems, were installed in nine dugout canoes belonging to octopus fishers from Popisi Village in North Banggai, Central Sulawesi. These solar powered devices automatically record the boats’  position every few seconds, and the data can be uploaded via the cellular phone netowrk. Surya Risuana, one of the LINI field staff, explained to the octopus fishers the purpose of the devices, and helped them to install the devices in their small dugouts. Octopus fishers fish in the coral reefs following the reef slopes, from early morning to midday.  With these devices, the project will have the opportunity to better understand the fishing patterns in the fishing grounds of the octopus fishers of Popisi village, and can be used as the basis for the development of  better fisheries management plans in the area.

Installing a VTS device in one of the dugout canoes

Octopus fishers and their VTS devices

Fisheries Improvement Project

Fisheries Improvement Project

A Fisheries Improvement Project (FIP) is an industry-led alliance of supply chain groups, from fishers to exporters to buyers, who work together to implement a management plan designed to help the fisheries meet the demands of the international market while reducing illegal fishing practices, habitat destruction and bycatch.

LINI and the Sustainable Fisheries Partnership are working together to help the seafood industry in Indonesia develop a Fisheries Improvement Project. LINI’s role is to assist small scale projects by supporting implementation of the projects in the field, including FIP training using SFP FIP tools, facilitating stakeholder consultations, and acting as coordinator for the industry-led FIP.

Information on the industry led FIPs is publicly available on the the industry website, which is administered by LINI. It is our role to assist the FIPs in updating FIP progress on the website, editing and reviewing the progress updates and supporting the administration of FIP implementation.

Blue Ventures

Blue Ventures

Blue Ventures collaborates with LINI to develop Community-based Octopus Fisheries Conservation Project in Banggai Island learning from Blue Ventures’ vast experience in Madagascar.