Fisheries Improvement Project

Fisheries Improvement Project

A Fisheries Improvement Project (FIP) is an industry-led alliance of supply chain groups, from fishers to exporters to buyers, who work together to implement a management plan designed to help the fisheries meet the demands of the international market while reducing illegal fishing practices, habitat destruction and bycatch.

LINI and the Sustainable Fisheries Partnership are working together to help the seafood industry in Indonesia develop a Fisheries Improvement Project. LINI’s role is to assist small scale projects by supporting implementation of the projects in the field, including FIP training using SFP FIP tools, facilitating stakeholder consultations, and acting as coordinator for the industry-led FIP.

Information on the industry led FIPs is publicly available on the the industry website, which is administered by LINI. It is our role to assist the FIPs in updating FIP progress on the website, editing and reviewing the progress updates and supporting the administration of FIP implementation.

Sustainable Ornamental Fisheries

Sustainable Ornamental Fisheries

Indonesia has been a hotspot of marine ornamental fish collection for the global market for at least 30 years. While the trade provides an important source of income for thousands of coastal communities, it is often based on unsustainable resource use and threatens the health of coastal marine ecosystems. A responsible and sustainable ornamental fish trade needs to be developed urgently and should be based on well-managed ecosystems and their resources, with shared responsibilities along the entire supply chains from the collectors to the consumers.

The marine ornamental trade in Indonesia has been active for so long that sustainability issues are now a matter for concern. Over-exploitation and the use of destructive collecting techniques are still widespread, with many high value targeted species being collected with cyanide. Stock mortalities remain high prior to export, because post -harvest handling techniques are poor and sourcing organisms that come from responsible and sustainable fisheries has also proven difficult due to a lack of reliable data.

As with other fisheries in Indonesia, effective reef fisheries management policies are currently lacking, and no local or national legal framework exists to support or regulate ornamental fish collection and trade. The trade is not an integrated business operation, which adds to the complexity of the supply chains. There are often several buyers between the collectors and exporters, which makes it a challenge to trace the origin of the stock. In addition, long trade routes negatively affect the health and survival rates of the organisms.

To address these issues, LINI, as the first and only local NGO working on the development of sustainable marine ornamental fisheries in Indonesia, aims to support the conservation and management of marine ornamental fisheries throughout Indonesia, by empowering coastal communities, providing training in practical skills, promoting fairer trade and more sustainable practices of marine resource use.

Reef Restoration

Reef Restoration

LINI is helping the coastal communities, in Buleleng and Karangasem – Bali and some places throughout Indonesia to rehabilitate their reefs by establishing artificial reef aggregation structures in damaged areas. The objective of this community-based reef rehabilitation is to regain the function of the reefs to serve as habitats for fish and other reef organisms, on which the coastal communities depend for their livelihoods.

In Bali, resorts are hosting reef restoration as part of their environmental care program. We help resorts to install artificial reefs, coral tables, and train their staff to monitor and maintain the sites.

LINI hopes to be able to continue assisting the coastal communities of Buleleng, who sincerely want to make positive changes to the marine environment there. Together with the fishing groups, LINI scientists have been monitoring and carefully recording the progress of reef restoration, and so far, the indications are good that significant numbers and species of fish (which had previously disappeared) are now returning to these reefs. The types of artificial reefs being installed include shrimp pots, roti buaya and fishdomes.

The LINI Aquaculture And Training Centre (LATC)

The LINI Aquaculture And Training Centre (LATC)

In December 2014, LINI started developing the LINI Aquaculture and Training Centre in Les Village, North Bali where LINI has been working with aquarium fishers since 2008. The development of the Centre responds directly to the need to reduce the destruction of Indonesia’s globally important coral reefs, and to create incentives for reef management and conservation that benefit coastal communities who depend on coral reef resources.

The Centre offers training and opportunity for work experience in various aspect of marine conservation, reef restoration, aquaculture, and sustainable fishery management. The Centre aims to target industry, fishers, government staff, and university students to learn about aquaculture, and will focus on teaching practical skills and knowledge about the breeding and husbandry of reef fish.

Our first juvenile Banggai Cardinalfish at the LATC